Monday, November 10, 2008

Ruby Tuesday meets history

For this Ruby Tuesday, Patti and I went to a great open house Sunday at the historic David Humphreys house in Ansonia, CT. Built in 1698, it is only 1 ½ miles from home. Yet, I have never been inside the house. 


However, members of the Derby Historical Society have a ramp that allows me and the ‘chair get to view the first floor. And there was cooking going on at two of the fireplaces, all in cast iron pots with red-hot embers on the lids. And it was great: Turkey, squash pie (and this pie was excellent!), vegetable soup, applesauce, cornbread.



Excellent food, and even more impressive was the number of students, elementary through high school that belong to the society and worked as hard as the adults in the pursuit of history. Like churning butter, which looks quite difficult And toasting bread at the fireplace (there is a iron tool for that back then). It was a great event.
David Humphreys was quite an impressive figure, an accomplished man and
entr
epreneur. He was a colonel in the Continental Army who was aide de camp to General George Washington during the Revolutionary War. I should learn more about him, an important figure of history in our area. Many thanks to the Derby Historical Society members, adults and students, for a great time. PS: All pictures taken at wheelchair height (you may have guessed...). Check out all the ruby gems at Mary's great site.

29 comments:

Felisol said...

Dear Ralph.
I love history and likewise historical sites. Helps us keep connected, kind of.
Isn't it always so that the near isn't always the dearest?

Apropos butter churning, we did that in first grade. Basically stirring a jar of thick whip cream till the butter segregated. Then add some salt.
I used to teach my young pupil the same.
from Felisol

Your EG Tour Guide said...

The historical society must have worked hard to put on such a fun event. And to think you'd never been inside the building even though you live so close! Glad you enjoyed yourself. ;-)

Linda said...

First off, I am now officially hungry! That meal sounds absolutely fantastic!

Second, isn't it great to be able to explore some of our country's history right here in our own backyards? I'm hoping to do more of that myself as time goes on and hopefully one of these days I'll get over your way to see this house in person!

marLou said...

Ralph - Thanks for the tour. It's nice to learn what it was like to live back in the day. The food sounds great!

ellen b said...

Hi Ralph,
Looks like a great place to visit! I enjoy this kinds of tours more and more as I get older...

~Just Me~ said...

What nice shots, I love seeing stuff like this.

napaboaniya said...

Wow~ Thanks for sharing the historic David Humphreys house.
Must have been quite an impressive tour :)

me ann my camera said...

The food sounds delicious and the setting wonderful. I enjoy historical settings and it is so fascinating to get a glimpse of how people lived in times past. As well as appreciating history, I go home appreciating the luxuries we have today compared to years ago. Lovely photos along with your very interesting text.

Jim said...

Hi Ralph, you had a nice day at the Humphrey House. I like to visit these old homes. Of course 1800's are old for Texas.
Happy RtU! Thank you for your visit and nice comment (today I was at
http://jimmiehov.blogspot.com/
which is my regular blog)
..

marcia@joyismygoal said...

I love the historical sites and there stories

Lucy Stern said...

I love cooking in cast iron. I actually cooked some hot dogs in my cast iron skillet tonight. I would love to see that place.

Paz said...

Sounds like a wonderful event. What a wonderful way to learn about the house and that time period. Cool photos.

Paz

Kay said...

What a neat day trip! Great photos,
I love doing the touristy thing when it comes to historical stuff…. Should do more, for sure!
Thanks for dropping by :)

Catherine said...

Bonjour Ralph,
Thanks to share your historical visit. That's according me , one of the better reason to blog: learning from others. How idealist am I this morning!
These beautiful Red wooden (I suppose) Houses are so different from our European style of buildings at the same time. Coming from all over the ocean I would have gone and visit Humphreys House,too. But that's clear that I don't always visit our nearest expositions. Human being is so done. I must add that since I blog I'm certainly more interested in what's going on around 'my world'. I'm sure it's the same for many photo/blogger.
Happy to read that young students are involved in keeping their History alive.
I love your blog, and certainly will go back, making you a little visit to LEARN.

Robin said...

I love visiting places that are able to really make history come alive. How wonderful that they were actually cooking a real traditional meal in the kitchen. Squash pie sounds delicious!

Dianne said...

what a great house! and it looks like it was a fantastic day :)

Mojo said...

There are museums, and then there's history. You got a chance to see the latter. And taste it too! Sounds like a fantastic way to spend a day.

Anndi said...

Keeping history alive brings us closer to Peace.

Bond said...

Fantastic post here today Ralph.

We are honoring the Veterans and Military from the USA and Canad today on THE COUCH

Pia K said...

That looks very pretty and sounds very interesting, I'll skip the turkey but I'd be happy for a slice of that squash pie:) Have a good RT!

byhisgracealone said...

sounds like a wonderful outing.......

blessings
donna

maryt/theteach said...

A beautiful RED clapboard (I think that's clapboard)house by an important Revolutionary War figure, Ralph. Thanks for telling is about the house. I'm sure I'm not too far from it to visit someday! :)

Norm said...

what a very interesting post, thanks for sharing...

People with Cameras said...

Wow, very cool tour for RT :) Thanks!

arlene said...

hi Ralph, interesting history! I am sure i would enjoy for any chanceof experiences like that - travelling back to history!

thanks for the visit at my RED entry.

Terry said...

Dear Ralph
Thanks so much for your visit. I have always enjoyed your comments over at Felisols'.

Oh! This is such a great Ruby Tuesday!
I LOVE historical old houses!
Bernie and I lived in an old red house like this for twenty years.
I used to wake up some nights with the nightmare that we had to move[we were just renters]
Well the time came that we were able to buy a house and the landlord would not sell us this one.
So we DID have to move..
Oh well I guess it was sort of a blessing in one way.
We never did mind the 25 amp service that we had tbere. We just knew how to work around blowing fuses.
When we moved into this 100 amp bungalow, we got the computer!
With 25 amp service, we could NEVER have the luxury!

Oh that red brick fire place Ralph..how grand!
I am glad that you took tbese pictures!

Terry said...

Ps..Of couse that Mr. Jim would remember old houses. He more than likely saw some of them being built!
On Oct 30 he reached the ripe old age of 106 Ralph!

Rhea said...

There are so few 17th-century buildings left in the country. I love them. You are lucky to live so close by.

Julie said...

Wow! Now I can honestly say that I don't think I've seen a building quite that old. Very cool to have nearby.